SFC Fluidics Awarded $1.5 Million Grant for Automated Medical Device

Firm's MD Analyzer seeks to help monitor patients with traumatic brain injury

Monday, January 13, 2014
SFC Fluidics researchers Brad Ledden (left) an associate scientist, and Anna Washburn, project manager.

SFC Fluidics researchers Brad Ledden (left) an associate scientist, and Anna Washburn, project manager.

FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. — SFC Fluidics Inc. has been awarded a $1.5 million federal research grant to continue its development of a portable, fully integrated and automated medical device for clinical monitoring of patients with severe traumatic brain injury.

Launched in 2003, SFC Fluidics is a medical device and diagnostics company headquartered at the Arkansas Research and Technology Park in Fayetteville. The University of Arkansas Technology Development Foundation manages the park.

The Phase II grant from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke of the National Institutes of Health supports SFC Fluidics’ MD Analyzer platform, which seeks to provide timely and clinically effective monitoring of patients suffering from severe traumatic brain injury. These patients are usually bedridden and unconscious for long periods of time during which they are unable to communicate with medical staff. Ongoing rapid and progressive changes to the patient’s condition, which go unnoticed, can lead to multiple organ failures and even death.

Current tests used to monitor a patient’s condition require the use of large equipment located in a centralized laboratory with the entire process taking several hours for the clinical results to reach the medical staff. During the hours-long wait for this clinical information, the patient’s condition can change significantly, potentially making the actions of the doctor ineffective.

The injured brain releases several biochemicals that can indicate whether patient health is improving or getting worse. Continuous measurement of these biomarkers will allow the trauma center staff to monitor the condition of the patient and customize the treatment strategy. MD Analyzer will be located at the patient’s bedside with a diagnostic readout every 10 minutes. Doctors will be able to closely and accurately track the progress of the patient, respond rapidly to any changes, and improve short- and long-term clinical outcomes.

SFC Fluidics is a portfolio company of VIC Technology Venture Development, a privately held firm based at the Innovation Center at the Arkansas Research and Technology Park.

 

Contacts:

Miriam Hudson-Courtney, communications manager
VIC Technology Venture Development
479-571-2592, miriam@victvd.com

Chris Branam, research communications writer/editor
University Relations
479-575-4737, cwbranam@uark.edu